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Publication received on the beginnings of institutional monument protection in Central Europe

3 July 2020

Monuments Board of the Slovak Republic

Institute of History, Slovak Academy of Sciences

Monumentorum tutela – Ochrana pamiatok 30 (2020)

Bratislava : Pamiatkový úrad Slovenskej republiky, 2020

ISBN 978-80-89175-89-5; ISSN 1336-4820

Monuments Board of the Slovak Republic
Institute of History, Slovak Academy of Sciences

International scientific conference
From the K. u k. Central-Commission to the European Heritage Label 
 
165th Anniversary of Establishment of the Royal and Imperial Central Commission
for Preservation and Research of Artistic Heritage (1853 – 2018)
The international scientific conference seeks to commemorate the beginnings of institutional monument protection in Central Europe.

On 10 January 1853, the Imperial and Royal Central Commission for Preservation and Research of Artistic Heritage started to operate. Thus began the actual practice of modern monument protection in the Habsburg Monarchy, and its continuity lasts to this day. The Central Commission intervened in all the Crownlands and left traces of its conservation and research work in each of them.
Already during the existence of the monarchy, an “autonomous” administration for monument protection in Hungary (for that time including also Slovakia) was established with competences determined by a special legal act (1881). At the same time, the initiatives of private scholars and learned societies have developed.
The fall of the monarchy in the years 1918–19 means an end of the primary stage of the institutional protection of monuments in Central Europe. But the “Viennese” legacy becomes a basis for heritage administration in various successor states: Austria, Czecho-Slovakia, Hungary, Poland, the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, and Italy. Advancing from the common grounds the practice of monument protection in these states set out to their own specific (national) ways.
The post-war idea of integration within Europe, originally in the spheres of industry and economics (1951), has gradually, and particularly after the political changes in 1989, developed into deeper cooperation also in the sphere of culture. The well-known historiographic fact of “common history” connecting Europe is successfully documented especially by the example of cultural heritage. The existence of mutually close cultural, architectonic and artistic phenomena in various countries has already led to a number of multilateral projects and ultimately also to the European Union’s initiative entitled the European Heritage Label (2011).

Conference themes:

  • Beginnings of the monument protection on the common basis of the “Danubian” Monarchy (notions, personalities, methods, results),
  • Modifications in various successor states after 1918,
  • Bridges to the current concept of the European Heritage.

All themes are drafted as general, with special attention to the older periods of the monument protection, and may include the variety of aspects: conservation and renovation of monuments, personalities, institutions, and also related topics: museums, collections of artistic heritage, antiquities market, visual art / sacred art and cultural heritage. 

Contents of publication

 Tomáš Kowalski (Monuments Board of the Slovak Republic, Bratislava/SK)

Introduction

Sandro Scarrocchia (Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera, Milan/I)

The Vienna School of Monuments Conservation: Riegl, Dvořák and Tietze

Alena Janatková (freelance researcher, Berlin/D)

Der moderne Denkmalkultus und die Erinnerungswerte

 Marek Krejčí (Center for Art Studies, Prague/CZ)

An Internationalisation of Monument Protection: the Legacy of the Central-Commission?

 Eastern Regions in the Carpathians

Waldemar Józef  Deluga (Faculty of Arts, University of Ostrava/CZ)

Protection of Eastern Christian Monuments in Bukovina at the End of the 19th and the Beginning of the 20th Century

Tomáš Kowalski (Monuments Board of the Slovak Republic, Bratislava/SK)

“…competence applies only to Slovakia.” State Monuments Department in Bratislava and Carpathian Ruthenia

Bohemia and Austrian Silesia

Jaroslav Horáček (Institute of Art History, Charles University, Prague/CZ)

Conservator František Xaver Beneš (1816–1888). An unknown personality in the beginnings of monument protection in Bohemia (in Czech)

Kristina Uhlíková (Institute of Art History, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague/CZ)

Monument Care in the Land of the Dual People: Czech and German Monument Care in Bohemia (in Czech)

Jana Marešová (Institute of Art History, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague/CZ)

Inventories of monuments under the patronage of the Archaeological Commission (in Czech)

Jan Uhlík (Institute of Art History, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague/CZ)

Bestia triumphans? The Role of the Inventory Commission of the Royal Capital City of Prague in the Documentation and Rescue of Historically Valuable Objects during Prague’s Urban Renewal

Pavel Šopák (Silesian Regional Museum, Opava/CZ)

Monuments Protection in the territory of Czech Silesia before 1918 (in Czech)

Southern parts of the monarchy

Vittorio Foramitti (Dipartimento Politecnico di Ingegneria e Architettura, Università degli Studi di Udine/I)

The Central Commission in North-Eastern Italy: Protagonists and Restorations in Friuli and Küstenland, 1853–1918

Franko Ćorić (Art History Department, University of Zagreb/HR)

Continuities and Discontinuities of the Policies of the Central Commission in Croatia

Historic Hungary: Slovakia and Hungary

József Sisa (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Art History, Budapest/H)

From the Central Commission to the National Commission of Monuments: Changing Institutional Framework and Principal Projects in the Kingdom of Hungary

Henrieta Žažová (University of Trnava/SK)

Hungarian Monuments Commission and the protection of castle architecture and fortifications (in Slovak)

Peter Buday (Chair of Art History, Faculty of Arts, Comenius University, Bratislava/SK)

Arnold Ipoly and restorations of medieval monuments (in Slovak)

Lilla Farbaky-Deklava (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Art History, Budapest/H)

Reconstruction of the Church of Deáki/Diakovce: a Change of Generations in Monument Conservation

 Karol Hollý (Institute of History, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava/SK)

The notions of “national collecting” in the Slovak national movement at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries in a pan-Hungarian context (in Slovak)

Štefan Gaučík (Institute of History, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava/SK)

Forgetting and Memory. Amendments to the work of József Könyöki in the field of monument protection (in Slovak)

Katarína Haberlandová (Institute of History, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava/SK)

Bratislava: historical context of the declaration as an urban historic reserve (in Slovak)

Further information: http://www.pamiatky.sk/en/page/from-the-zentral-commission-to-the-european-heritage-label

Contact: Mgr. Tomáš Kowalski, Cesta na Červený most 6 | SK – 814 06 Bratislava | Slovenská republika | Tel.: +421 2/ 204 64 337 | tomas.kowalski@pamiatky.gov.sk | www.pamiatky.sk

 

 

 

 

 

 

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